In it, but not of it. TPM DC

Divisions among Senate Republicans have burst a trial balloon floated in recent days by two top lieutenants of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to eliminate the 60-vote rule for confirming Supreme Court nominees.

That doesn't mean the idea is dead — it's just on the shelf, ready to make a comeback when the situation calls for it. The most likely situation? A perfect storm of a White House and Senate controlled by the same party with a Senate minority threatening to filibuster a Supreme Court nominee. It's not a hard scenario to imagine, especially for Republicans optimistic about their prospects of recapturing the White House in 2016.

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Senate Democrats are threatening to filibuster Republican-led legislation to keep the Department of Homeland Security funded because it overturns President Barack Obama's immigration actions, and a divided GOP hasn't yet settled on a fallback plan to avoid a partial government shutdown at the end of February.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) announced that the Senate will hold a procedural vote Tuesday to advance a House-passed bill to fund DHS and reverse Obama's executive moves to shield millions of unlawful immigrants, including those brought to the U.S. as children, from the threat of deportation.

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In his fiscal 2016 budget, released Monday, President Barack Obama proposed allowing married same-sex couples to receive spousal Social Security benefits, regardless of which state they live in. Currently, married same-sex couples lose their benefits it they move to a state that does not recognize their unions.

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President Barack Obama signaled in his fiscal year 2016 budget released Monday that he was ready for the fight over Social Security that congressional Republicans made clear last month they wanted

Obama's budget included the transfer of tax revenue from the program's retirement fund to the disability fund, which would otherwise start being unable to pay full benefits in late 2016. House Republicans passed a rule in January that would block the transfer -- known as reallocation -- unless Social Security's overall solvency was improved.

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This post has been updated to clarify the survey's findings.

How is this possible? More than one-third of people who are still uninsured under Obamacare -- but appear to be eligible for coverage and sought it out -- were told that they were not eligible for health insurance under the law, according to a new report.

The finding, from a survey of 10,500 uninsured Americans by the non-profit Kaiser Family Foundation, is truly perplexing. If you extrapolate out to the overall uninsured population in the United States, it means that more than two million people who by the letter of the law should be covered were told that they weren't qualified.

"I've got no possible explanation for you," Caroline Pearson, vice president of Avalere Health, an independent consulting firm and a top expert on health policy, told TPM. That's a bit of an exaggeration -- she and others had some educated guesses -- but it's not that far off.

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