In it, but not of it. TPM DC

There's been an ongoing pattern of the 2014 election cycle: Democrats hope contested, bloody primaries between Republican candidates will create an opening for them. In Pennsylvania though the situation is flipped. Republicans are hoping an ongoing bloody Democratic primary will create an opening to save incumbent Gov. Tom Corbett (R), who's suffering from particularly low approval numbers.

"Whoever emerges, they are going to be bruised as everyone has to run to the left in the primary. Bruised and broke after having to spend a lot of money," Republican Governors Association press secretary Jon Thompson told TPM.

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In a move with big election-year implications, the Obama administration announced Monday that it would reverse a proposed cut to private Medicare Advantage plans. The decision undercuts one of the GOP's favorite lines of attack on Obamacare and on Democrats in general.

The change announced by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services transformed what was a projected 1.9 percent payment cut in 2015 that had been proposed in February into a projected 0.4 percent payment increase.

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Harry Reid's war on the Koch brothers -- the wealthy oil tycoons who are spending millions to defeat Democrats in the 2014 mid-terms -- has sparked an intense backlash from Republicans and prominent conservatives.

The feud has grown acrimonious and personal over the last few weeks, with figures on the right leaping to the defense of the Kochs and even suggesting that the Democratic Senate majority leader is mentally unstable.

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The news last week that Obamacare had reached 7 million enrollees killed a number of conservatives' favorite memes against the law -- more people had lost coverage than gained it, nobody wanted to sign up for it at all, etc. But even with some of the law's best news in months, one attack was still going strong.

Obamacare is a raw deal -- a disaster, really -- for young Americans.

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Brendan Eich's ouster as CEO of Mozilla, the maker of Firefox, sparked a firestorm of outrage of those on right who say he was being persecuted for his anti-LGBT views and that the company's reputation was irreparably tarnished.

On Thursday Mozilla, the maker of the Firefox browser, announced that Eich had decided to step down as CEO only two weeks after he took the post. The decision followed the online dating website OkCupid posting a message to Firefox users going to the site noting that Eich donated $1,000 to the California's Proposition 8, the constitutional amendment that outlawed same-sex marriages.

"The online dating service OKCupid called for a boycott of Mozilla," Redstate editor Erick Erickson wrote in a blogpost. "Contributing to an unpopular cause six years ago — during a time the left claimed 'dissent is patriotic' — is enough to blacklist Eich. The objections to his hire are not based on his competence, experience, or resume, but on $1000.00."

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