In it, but not of it. TPM DC

Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN), one of the Republicans who has been skeptical of the plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a replacement, elaborated on his concerns Monday evening, pointing specifically to how lawmakers will fund its replacement if the Obamacare taxes are repealed right away.

"It just seems to me that probably you’re better off working this all out together," Corker said. "That may not end up being the case and that of course would take some Democratic cooperation, but I think people are beginning to realize that throwing $116 billion dollars in a mud puddle is a pretty big deal."

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Wednesday is shaping up to be a blockbuster day in political news, with Senate confirmation hearings scheduled for six of Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees in addition to the President-elect holding his first press conference since July in midtown Manhattan.

That stacked schedule has some senior Democrats crying foul. They argue that, with the attention of the public and the political press divided between cities and hearings, Republicans will have an easier time forcing through some of the President-elect’s more controversial appointees.

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Lost in the public outcry over an ultimately failed proposal to gut the independent Office of Congressional Ethics, House Republicans this week approved the reinstatement of an esoteric rule that could have a deeply chilling effect on the federal workforce.

The Holman Rule, passed Tuesday as part of the broader rules package for the 115th Congress, allows individual lawmakers to propose amendments to appropriations bills that request the termination of any government program or the reduction of the annual salary of individual federal employees to as low as $1.

A majority of the House and Senate would still need to approve any such amendment, but the lawmaker behind the resuscitation of the arcane rule said he fully expects it to be put to use.

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Only one in five Americans agrees with the current Republican plan of repealing Obamacare without the details of a replacement being worked about, a new poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found. But the poll found a narrow divide among respondents on the question of whether to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

According to the survey released Friday, 47 percent of respondents said lawmakers should not vote on a repeal, 28 percent would prefer that a repeal vote wait until the details of a replacement planned are announced, and 20 percent would like to see a repeal vote immediately with replacement details worked out later.

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