In it, but not of it. TPM DC

Hillary Clinton will be in Iowa on Sunday, and the national press is dispensing with the formalities: She is running for president. No if's, and's or deeply personal decisions about it.

"Let’s just get this out of the way now: She’s running," BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith wrote Friday in a preview of sorts for Clinton's appearance Sunday at Sen. Tom Harkin's 37th steak fry in Indianola, Iowa.

Amy Chozick of the New York Times wrote a detailed piece on Friday, a thorough reading of the proverbial tea leaves. Some were superficial -- Hillary is taking yoga (to prepare for the physical rigors of a campaign) -- while others were substantive. She has been asking Wall Street types what they think of President Obama's fiscal policies and inquiring about the best people to know in Iowa.

“It’s very obvious what’s she going to do,” Sue Dvorsky, a former chairwoman of the Iowa Democratic Party, told Chozick. “Clearly she’s going to run.”

Read More →

South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford took the liberty of airing his legal troubles with his ex-wife in excruciating detail on Friday afternoon.

In a 2,343 word Facebook post, the Republican congressman wrote about several lawsuits and child custody disputes with his ex-wife Jenny Sanford, whom he left for an Argentinian woman he was cheating with while he was governor. He revealed in the post that the woman, Maria Belen Chapur, is no longer his fiancé.

Read More →

Can Hillary Clinton's presumed 2016 frontrunner status be reduced to her chromosomes? That view seems to have penetrated the D.C. punditocracy, as relayed by NBC's newly christened "Meet The Press" moderator Chuck Todd on Monday.

Todd said in an interview on the Charlie Rose Show that the former secretary of state and U.S. senator would not be the prohibitive favorite "if she were running to be the second woman president."

"If she were running to be the second woman president, I think she would not even be considered a frontrunner," he said, according to a transcript provided to TPM. "She'd be just considered another candidate."

Rose and Todd referenced the "historical narrative" that Clinton would have in 2016 -- one that wasn't as prevalent in 2008, when she was running against another historical candidate in Barack Obama. "This time hers seems that kind of powerful," Todd said. "It does feel that powerful."

Read More →

TPMLivewire