In it, but not of it. TPM DC

President Barack Obama is considering delaying some or all of his promised executive actions on immigration until after the election, according to the Los Angeles Times and the New York Times.

Publicly the White House has maintained for weeks he intends to act by the end of this summer.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest wouldn't confirm or deny the reports when asked on Friday, saying, "I don't have an update on timing." Several White House officials didn't respond to requests for comment.

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In anticipation of an upcoming Hillary Clinton speech on clean energy, one of the groups laying the groundwork for her presumed 2016 presidential campaign is talking up the former Secretary of State's record on climate change.

Clinton is scheduled to give the keynote address at the National Clean Energy Summit this Thursday in Las Vegas. Correct the Record, the rapid response outfit in the proto-Hillary 2016 campaign infrastructure, shared with TPM new talking points detailing her record on climate change at the State Department.

The group has been regularly releasing reports outlining Clinton's record on various issues, from LGBT rights to income equality, for months. They are part of the group's overall mission of greasing the wheels for Clinton's various public appearances and putting a positive spin on her past work -- all in the context of an anticipated 2016 run.

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Pennsylvania and the Obama administration have reached a deal to expand Medicaid under Obamacare, the administration announced Thursday.

The state, under Gov. Tom Corbett (R), and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have been negotiating for much of the last year to expand coverage to 500,000 low-income Pennsylvanians. Under the waiver approved by CMS on Thursday, coverage will start in January 2015.

Both sides appear to have given something up in the agreement, which makes Pennsylvania the 27th state, plus Washington, D.C., to expand Medicaid.

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The implosion of the GOP's all-or-nothing assault on Obamacare might have started on Election Night 2010. Republicans thought they had been validated in their relentless attacks on the law, swept to huge victories in the House. Four years ago, it seemed unthinkable that they would ever waver.

As recently as last fall, conservatives felt as confident as they'd ever been when the federal health insurance exchange HealthCare.gov failed miserably in its first days. It reinvigorated their faith in fighting the law after the U.S. Supreme Court and 2012 presidential election dealt that thinking a serious blow.

But since the heady days of cancelled policies and a balky website, the political viability of absolutist repeal has been on a downward spiral. It was probably a decline made inevitable when President Barack Obama beat Mitt Romney in 2012, which ensured that repeal would at least be vetoed for another four years. But that decline has been slow enough that it can be difficult to detect.

Even though Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), who fancies himself to be a thought leader in the party, still tweets #FullRepeal with regularity, he's become an increasingly lonely voice. The use of Obamacare as an effective Republican attack looks almost at its end. It's been a long time coming.

"It really is extraordinary in a lot of ways. Republicans were absolutely convinced that the antipathy toward the ACA would be the ticket to victory," Norm Ornstein, a congressional scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, told TPM. "Now they still may have a ticket to victory, but it's not going to be that."

Ornstein called the GOP's singular focus on attacking Obamacare -- and inability to foresee that it would eventually collapse on them -- "a textbook case of mass psychology."

"They basically worked themselves up into a frenzy over the notion that this was a government takeover of health care and socialism," he said. "I think they convinced themselves that this was so awful, that they denied any objective reality."

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Jurors could begin deliberating as early as Friday in the federal corruption case against Virginia ex-Gov. Bob McDonnell (R) and his wife Maureen. Over five weeks of testimony, jurors have heard a barrage of details about the McDonnells’ finances and about their interactions with a wealthy Virginia businessman, Jonnie Williams, from whom the couple is accused of taking $177,000 worth of gifts and loans in exchange for lending the credibility of the governor’s office to Williams’ dietary supplements company.

But without a doubt, the most engrossing aspect of the trial has been the revelations about the McDonnells’ marriage. In testimony, the governor painted a picture of his marriage veering so far into soap opera territory that pundits began referring to it as the “crazy wife” defense. Legal experts told TPM that was an unprecedented strategy to deploy in such a high-profile criminal case.

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