In it, but not of it. TPM DC

President Barack Obama's promised executive actions on immigration are shaping up to put Speaker John Boehner in a bind between the passions of his conservative base and the GOP's long-term viability as a national party.

Some staunch conservatives are hopping mad and already floating impeachment over it — but could that actually spur House GOP leaders to do it?

The White House insists it might. Democrats are giddily fundraising off the notion of imminent impeachment, which Boehner calls a "scam," repeating that the House has no plans to go down that road. But the question political scientists and strategists are mulling is whether Obama's executive move, which is expected to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation, could actually inflame the GOP base enough to push Boehner down that path.

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The 2014 election cycle has so far been framed as an epic matchup between the tea party wing of the Republican Party and more establishment types. The establishment has thus far only lost one such beltway insider: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (VA).

Otherwise, tea party-favored candidates have struggled to gain ground. A new analysis from the firm HaystaqDNA could explain why: county-by-county tallying of tea party support reveals that its strongholds may be in the West rather than in key southern states where candidates have mounted serious incumbent challenges.

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A new White House report released Tuesday warns that delaying environmental action would be costly and argues that swift action serves as "climate insurance" to mitigate the "most severe and irreversible potential consequences of climate change."

The report, titled "A Cost Of Delaying Action To Stem Climate Change," comes in the wake of the Obama administration's decision to bypass Congress and propose new rules on coal-fired power plants aimed at slashing carbon pollution by 30 percent by 2030.

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Jonathan Gruber, an MIT professor and one of the top outside experts who helped draft Obamacare, caused quite a stir last week when a video surfaced in which he appeared to take the same stance as the law's opponents on a key issue currently before the courts.

In the video, which was originally shot in January 2012, and in an audio tape from a separate event that same year, Gruber seemed to endorse the view that the law's tax credits would not be available to Americans shopping on HealthCare.gov, the federal health insurance exchange. The site has been the fallback option for the 36 states that don't set up their own.

The fervor was so great that White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest was asked about Gruber's video at Friday's press briefing. He said there was "ample evidence ... that (Gruber) supports the administration's view."

And that appears to be true. In numerous other occasions, Gruber adopted the administration's reading of the law. It took place in both his own analysis during Obamacare's development and then again in a court brief filed to support the White House's argument in the current lawsuit. It was also apparent in several other public statements.

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House Republican leaders are hoping to vote next week, before the August recess, on a package to address the humanitarian crisis on the southern border.

The conference met on Friday morning to discuss a path forward and, according to a GOP leadership aide, is closing in on a proposal to provide less than $1 billion in funding and amend a 2008 anti-trafficking law that prohibits U.S. officials from swiftly sending back minors at the border who are coming from countries other than Mexico and Canada.

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An online video has surfaced in which MIT professor Jonathan Gruber, one of the top outside experts consulted during Obamacare's drafting, appears to endorse the view advanced by conservatives that the law's tax credits would not be available for people using HealthCare.gov.

The Competitive Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, published the video on Thursday evening. The organization said it was shot at a January 2012 event hosted by Noblis, a non-profit research group, at which Gruber spoke.

During a Q&A session, Gruber was asked in the video about Obamacare's health insurance exchanges. He said he thought the federal government "wants to squeeze the states" to set up their own exchanges by being slow to develop the federal website, which would be the back-stop for any state that didn't establish one. He then moved onto the tax-credit issue.

"What’s important to remember politically about this is if you're a state and you don’t set up an exchange, that means your citizens don't get their tax credits. But your citizens still pay the taxes that support this bill," he said in the video. "So you’re essentially saying to your citizens you’re going to pay all the taxes to help all the other states in the country. I hope that that's a blatant enough political reality that states will get their act together and realize there are billions of dollars at stake here in setting up these exchanges and that they'll do it. But, you know, once again the politics can get ugly around this."

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A top confidant to President Barack Obama told reporters on Friday that House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) has "opened the door" to impeaching the president by moving to sue him.

"I think Speaker Boehner, by going down the path of this lawsuit, has opened the door to impeachment sometime in the future," White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said at a Washington breakfast hosted by the Christian Science Monitor.

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Could the federal government shut down again this fall?

The idea sounds absurd on its face, especially one month before an election, and one year after Republicans took a drubbing in the polls for forcing a shutdown over Obamacare.

But it could happen. Congress is currently on course for a battle to keep the federal government funded when the new fiscal year begins on Oct. 1. Even though the two parties agreed to a discretionary spending level of $1.014 trillion for fiscal year 2015, the appropriations process has screeched to a halt over extraneous policy issues and procedural disputes. And so a stopgap measure appears inevitable.

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Conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court might have already tipped their hand on the latest substantial legal threat to Obamacare, according to one Yale law professor. And if they did, it would be good news for the Obama administration.

A federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., ruled Tuesday that Obamacare's language did not allow people shopping on HealthCare.gov to access tax credits if they purchase insurance through the federal website. If that decision were to become law, affecting the 36 states served by the federal exchange, it would strip subsidies from nearly 5 million people and send their premiums skyrocketing. Without some sort of administrative rescue from the Obama administration, it would significantly gut the law.

Another federal appeals court in Virginia ruled the opposite way on the same day. Legal analysts have said it is at least possible that the case will end up in front of the Supreme Court, which largely upheld Obamacare in 2012. But the court's conservative streak has struck down some of the law's other provisions.

Abbe Gluck, a law professor at Yale University, highlighted some passages this week for a piece for Politico that showed how the court's conservative justices seemed to have already interpreted the issue in the 2012 ruling.

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