In it, but not of it. TPM DC

As Republicans made their case for suing President Barack Obama during a House hearing Wednesday, Democrats warned that they were embarking on a dangerous new precedent that could dramatically enhance the power of the judiciary.

The Rules Committee, where Republicans have a 9-4 split, is expected to vote next week on the measure to sue Obama for unilaterally delaying the Obamacare employer mandate. From there it'll go to the House floor, where Speaker John Boehner has promised a vote this month. Aides in both parties widely expect it to pass the full House.

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Establishment Republicans and allies of Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS) have scoffed at state Sen. Chris McDaniel's (R) claims of rampant voter fraud in the runoff election between the two for U.S. Senate. But, ahead of a press conference on Wednesday where McDaniel plans to discuss the evidence he's found, Cochran's campaign and the Mississippi Republican Party have also taken steps to prepare for some kind of lawsuit.

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Sarah Palin, your wish is not granted.

A panel of the House's staunchest conservatives on Tuesday rebuffed the former Alaska governor when asked about her call last week for impeaching President Barack Obama. Some said impeachment was impractical, some said it would hurt the GOP politically and others cautioned that Obama hasn't committed high crimes and misdemeanors.

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The White House and House Oversight Chair Darrell Issa are perennially at war. But this time it has gotten strange and personal, and the California Republican isn't backing down.

Issa has been on what Democrats call a "subpoena binge" against Obama administration officials in pursuit of scandals involving Benghazi, the IRS and other issues that animate conservatives.

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A majority of voters in the runoff election for U.S. Senate in believe Sen. Thad Cochran (R-MS) rightfully won over Mississippi state Sen. Chris McDaniel (R), according to a new Public Policy Polling survey obtained by TPM. But broken down by party affiliation, Republicans seem more divided over the results.

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Last fall's government shutdown and subsequent two-year budget accord injected a sense of hope that Congress would be able to keep important federal programs running this year without partisan fights that threaten disruptions.

But election-year considerations and a Republican party hungry for confrontation with President Barack Obama have dimmed prospects for a drama-free summer. Congress has 12 working days before the five-week August recess. After that it'll have a mere 10 working days before federal agencies and programs will need to be funded to avert a government shutdown on Oct. 1.

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