TPM Cafe: Opinion

Last week, the bell sounded on a new round of education policy’s biggest battle—to almost no media fanfare at all. While most of the Beltway was fulminating over leaving tar sands behind in Canada and American leaders left out of the Charlie Hebdo protests in Paris, Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) released his draft bill to roll back large sections of No Child Left Behind.

Read More →

It’s now been 42 years since the Supreme Court held that a woman’s right to privacy included the right to abortion. It’s hardly a secret that this right is slowly but surely eroding. From multi-day waiting periods to severe restrictions on certain forms of abortion to whatever’s happening in Texas this week, the assaults on Roe v. Wade are getting more creative every year.

Read More →

In this year’s State of the Union, President Obama presented a clear road map for ensuring that the United States will remain the predominant power in the world for generations to come. Foreign policy elites who lament the primary focus on “domestic issues” are missing the main point of this year’s address and indeed the Obama presidency: A strong, confident American middle class is a prerequisite for the exercise of American power and leadership on the world stage.

Read More →

In 2011, when South Dakota proposed the first 72-hour wait for a woman trying to get an abortion, the restriction was quickly seen for exactly what it was: an unprecedented attempt to create such a blatant roadblock that she would either leave the state or carry the pregnancy to term. While the South Dakota mandate (which also required a pregnant person to visit a crisis pregnancy center in between her two clinic appointments before she would be allowed to terminate) was held up in court, Utah passed a similar 72-hour wait, this time without a mandatory counseling session from an anti-abortion activist. Their bill went into effect in 2012.

Read More →

This Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a film featuring Dr. King is making news. The recent controversy surrounding Ava DuVernay’s Selma has been the sense that it was snubbed in last week’s Academy Award nominees: The film received a Best Picture and Best Song nod, but no other nominations, with director DuVernay, star David Oyelowo, and screenwriter Paul Webb among those left out. People have made various arguments for why the film received so few nominations—from a relative lack of quality to an overall trend that saw no actors of color included among any of the 20 acting nominees—but it’s quite possible that the controversy over Selma’s portrayal of history contributed to the snubs.

Read More →

"I feel most colored when I am thrown against a sharp white background," Zora Neale Hurston wrote in her essay “How It Feels To Be Colored Me.” I remembered this line in the early moments of Ava DuVernay's Selma, when Annie Lee Cooper approaches the county clerk's window to attempt to register to vote in a not-so-distant past. The clerk's contempt is immediate and demands Cooper individually name 67 county clerks for the state of Alabama, before inevitably denying her application.

Read More →

This week, Tiffany & Co. published its first ad featuring a same-sex couple. The famed luxury jeweler, known for its iconic Robin’s Egg blue boxes, has joined a host of other American companies in not just embracing same-sex couples but actively featuring people who are gay, lesbian and transgender in their advertising. In 2014, Barney’s spring campaign starred transgender models. In 2012, JCPenney’s featured same-sex couples for Father’s Day (or Fathers’ Day) campaigns. And there are many more examples.

Read More →
Want to contribute to TPM Cafe? Email ideas for your pieces to us at talk@talkingpointsmemo.com
Want to contribute to TPM Cafe? Email ideas for your pieces to us at talk@talkingpointsmemo.com

LiveWire